Cave


Cave
   There are numerous natural caves among the limestone rocks of Syria, many of which have been artificially enlarged for various purposes.
   The first notice of a cave occurs in the history of Lot (Gen. 19:30).
   The next we read of is the cave of Machpelah (q.v.), which Abraham purchased from the sons of Heth (Gen. 25:9, 10). It was the burying-place of Sarah and of Abraham himself, also of Isaac, Rebekah, Leah, and Jacob (Gen. 49:31; 50:13).
   The cave of Makkedah, into which the five Amorite kings retired after their defeat by Joshua (10:16, 27).
   The cave of Adullam (q.v.), an immense natural cavern, where David hid himself from Saul (1 Sam. 22:1, 2).
   The cave of Engedi (q.v.), now called Ain Jidy, i.e., the "Fountain of the Kid", where David cut off the skirt of Saul's robe (24:4). Here he also found a shelter for himself and his followers to the number of 600 (23:29; 24:1). "On all sides the country is full of caverns which might serve as lurking-places for David and his men, as they do for outlaws at the present day."
   The cave in which Obadiah hid the prophets (1 Kings 18:4) was probably in the north, but it cannot be identified.
   The cave of Elijah (1 Kings 19:9), and the "cleft" of Moses on Horeb (Ex. 33:22), cannot be determined.
   In the time of Gideon the Israelites took refuge from the Midianites in dens and caves, such as abounded in the mountain regions of Manasseh (Judg. 6:2).
   Caves were frequently used as dwelling-places (Num. 24:21; Cant. 2:14; Jer. 49:16; Obad. 1:3). "The excavations at Deir Dubban, on the south side of the wady leading to Santa Hanneh, are probably the dwellings of the Horites," the ancient inhabitants of Idumea Proper. The pits or cavities in rocks were also sometimes used as prisons (Isa. 24:22; 51:14; Zech. 9:11). Those which had niches in their sides were occupied as burying-places (Ezek. 32:23; John 11:38).

Easton's Bible Dictionary. . 1897.

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  • cave — cave …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • cavé — cavé …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • cave — 1. (ka v ) s. f. 1°   Toute espèce de réduit souterrain. Le sol des caves de l Observatoire de Paris est à 26 mètres sous terre ; et leur température constante à dix degrés centigrades au dessus de zéro, les fait trouver chaudes en hiver et… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • CAVE — oder Cave steht für: Cave 54, ein Studentenjazzclub in Heidelberg ein lateinisches Wort im Sinne von Hüte Dich!; siehe Cave eine Gemeinde in der Provinz Rom in Italien, siehe Cave (Latium) einen japanischen Hersteller von Videospielen und… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • cave — CAVE. s. f. Lieu souterrain et voûté où l on met ordinairement du vin et d autres provisions. Bonne cave. Cave profonde. Une cave fraîche. Avoir du vin en cave. Avoir une cave bien garnie. Faire descendre du vin dans une cave. Mettre du bois dans …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • Cave — (k[=a]v), n. [F. cave, L. cavus hollow, whence cavea cavity. Cf. {Cage}.] 1. A hollow place in the earth, either natural or artificial; a subterraneous cavity; a cavern; a den. [1913 Webster] 2. Any hollow place, or part; a cavity. [Obs.] The… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • cave — cave; cave·man; con·ca·vo con·cave; en·cave; con·cave; con·cave·ly; con·cave·ness; …   English syllables

  • Cave — cave. m. Ecuad. Acción y efecto de cavar (ǁ cosechar papas). * * * (as used in expressions) Jewel Cave National Monument Mammoth Cave, parque nacional Russell Cave National Monument …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Cave — Cave, v. i. 1. To dwell in a cave. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. [See To cave in, below.] To fall in or down; as, the sand bank caved. Hence (Slang), to retreat from a position; to give way; to yield in a disputed matter. [1913 Webster] {To cave …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English